Thursday, 4 May 2017

GH5 IBIS is as good as Olympus

The Lumix GH5 is the first GH series camera to have IBIS, in body image stabilization. This means that even prime lenses without any OIS feature can be stabilized, in both photos and videos. But how does it compare with the Olympus E-M5 Mark II, which made waves in this area almost a couple of years ago, with a fantastic video image stabilization?

In this article, I put them head to head. To avoid any possible advantage of using the same brand name lens as camera body, I have used the third party Sigma 30mm f/2.8 Art lenses, which I like a lot:


Both cameras are mounted to a Desmond stereo bracket here. They are both recording in 1080p resolution, with 60FPS framerate. I have both set to f/2.8 aperture, and using continuous autofocus. Here is the comparison:



A note about the autofocus speed of the Lumix GH5. In this video, I set both the AF sliders to max, "AF Speed" and "AF Sensitivity". Without this change, the GH5 would have been hopelessly slower to focus than the Olympus camera in this comparison.


However, in real life use, I don't think I would have set them this high. After all, it is seldom you need the AF to react this fast in real life usage.

My analysis of the outcome, is that the Lumix GH5 is just as good as the Olympus camera when it comes to stabilizing the video stream. So it shows that Panasonic have come a long way with IBIS!

4 comments:

  1. As good as Olympus camera a year ago. E-M1 II IBIS is better than E-M5 II IBIS. 5.5 stops vs 5 stops.

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  2. I've wondered for some time, but wouldn't it be better to have both cameras above each other, instead of besides? It would keep the same perspective, apart from the vertical axis, which I think has less importance than the horizontal one.

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  3. OT: Can you do a post for recommended settings for stills on the GH5. All I'm seeing are settings for video online.

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  4. Great Post, Thanks for sharing this. Panasonic Mirrorless Lenses are best for videography and photography.

    ReplyDelete